Skip to main content

Giving something back

  • Unlike climate change, biodiversity is tangible, and the effort you put in can be seen on the ground (think about planting a flower), so roll up your sleeves and get your hands dirty.
  • Biodiversity does not require erecting a fence and a 'do not touch' sign. In fact, the opposite is often true, such as the case in the Burren where active management is helping to conserve the landscape.
  • Simply enjoying biodiversity adds value to it, while biodiversity which has links to local history and culture is even more valuable, particularly to local communities. Recognizing and recording the role played by biodiversity in local history is therefore an important aid to biodiversity conservation.
  • The relationships between a single species and other species in their habitat have evolved over millennia to become interdependent. When introducing new species, always choose native species and avoid releasing exotic or non-native species into the wild.
  • How often have we cleared large tracts of habitats, only to try and replace them with the same in the new landscape plan? Where possible, retain existing habitats in our gardens, development sites and farms. 
  • Avoid cutting hedgerows between March 1st and August 31st as this is the prime breeding season for birds.
  • 'Neat and Tidy' is rarely good for biodiversity. Where possible, manage lawns and grassy areas as traditional hay meadows, mowing only once a year in late summer and avoiding all chemicals. Even doing this around edges and in corners will encourage wild flowers, butterflies and insects, birds and other small mammals such as hedgehogs. 
  • Bird feeders can be the difference between life and death during harsh winters so remember to feed the birds. In return they will provide plenty of colour and song, while nest boxes for both birds and bats provide invaluable refuge for breeding.

Page last reviewed: 22/05/18

Back to top